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FAQ

 

GENERAL FAQ’s

One of the key objectives of MTC is to enhance government services to achieve higher level of citizen / customer satisfaction by:

  • Providing timely & secure access to essential information,
  • Enabling seamless integration of Government services
  • Improving the efficiency of service delivery.

To achieve the above objective, MTC has established the “Oman eGovernment Framework” which is a set of architectural standards, best practices and process management systems.

The framework and the associated reference documents enable MTC to:

  • Increase IT maturity
  • Simplify and Unify common IT processes
  • Increase efficiency
  • Enhance secure communication
  • Promote effective collaboration across government entities and service providers from the private sector.

Starting from this blueprint, the working group members have developed the “Oman eGovernment Architecture Framework” – also known in short as “OeGAF” that will be published on the MTC website.

The Oman eGovernment Architecture Framework (OeGAF) is a structured framework similar to the Architecture blue print of a “Town Planning Authority”. The purpose of the framework is to lay down the building blocks, principles and standards that guide the design, construction, deployment and management of distributed Information Systems across the various Government Agencies.

If you are new to the concept of enterprise architecture and OeGAF you may find it worthwhile to read the set of Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ’s), that will enable you to understand the following:

  • Understand Enterprise Architecture
  • Understand Enterprise Architecture Framework
  • Understand Oman eGovernance Framework
  • Understand the components / architectures of Oman eGovernance Framework
  • Understand OeGAF and the origin of OEGAF
  • Understand the structure of OeGAF
  • Understand the various architectures of OeGAF
  • Understand the relationships between the various architectures of OeGAF
  • Understand the importance OeGAF and how it is helpful to the government agencies
  • Understand how to navigate through OeGAF
  • Understand the standards management and governance structure of OeGAF
  • Understand the team involved in developing Oman eGovernment Architecture Framework
  • Understand what compliance to OeGAF means and how government agencies can assess compliance of their IT Systems to OeGAF
  • Understand how MTC will help government agencies in understanding, using and assessing and enhancing compliance to OeGAF
     

1. What is Enterprise Architecture? Why you should know Enterprise Architecture?
Enterprise architecture (EA) is a rigorous description of the structure of an enterprise, its decomposition into subsystems, the relationships between the subsystems, the relationships with the external environment, the terminology to use, and the guiding principles for the design and evolution of an enterprise. This description is comprehensive, including enterprise goals, business functions, business information, software applications and computer systems.
It is important that you are aware of Enterprise Architecture because in today’s trend. Enterprise Architecture is taking the centre stage in organizations. In-fact organizations are investing in practitioners of EA who call themselves "enterprise architects." An enterprise architect is a person responsible for developing the enterprise architecture and is often called upon to draw conclusions from it. By producing enterprise architecture, architects are providing a tool for identifying opportunities to improve the enterprise, in a manner that more effectively and efficiently pursues its purpose.
You can also refer to Federal Enterprise Architecture (FEA) and The Open Group Architecture Framework (TOGAF) for further insight and understanding on the subject of Enterprise Architecture and Enterprise Architecture Development and Methodology.

2. How does Enterprise Architecture help you?
Enterprise Architecture helps an organization in aligning its IT infrastructure, related systems and components in realizing the business objectives of the top management.

3. What is Oman eGovenance Framework?
Oman eGovernance Framework is a set of standards / best practices and process management systems to enhance the delivery of Government Services in alignment with the Mission of MTC.

The framework spells the rules and procedures to ensure that Government IT projects and systems sustain and extend MTC’s strategies and objectives. It will also provide assurance about the value of IT, provide framework for the management of IT-related risks and putting together controls to minimize risks and better deliver IT initiatives. Figure 1 below illustrates the envisaged framework.
The “Oman eGovernance Framework” consists of the following building blocks:

  1. Oman e-Government Architecture Framework (OeGAF)

  2. Process Management Systems

  3. Standards Working Groups

  4. Standards Management Process

  5. Standards / Guidelines Resource Library.

4. What are the components of Oman eGovernance Framework?
The “Oman eGovernance Framework” consists of the following building blocks:

  • Oman e-Government Architecture Framework (OeGAF)

  • Process Management Systems

  • Standards Working Groups

  • Standards Management Process

  • Standards / Guidelines Resource Library.

    4.1. Oman eGovernment Architecture Framework (OeGAF)
    The Oman eGovernment Architecture Framework (OeGAF) is a structured framework similar to the Architecture blue print of a “Town Planning Authority”. The purpose of the framework is to lay down the building blocks, principles and standards that guide the design, construction, deployment and management of distributed Information Systems across the various Government Agencies.

    4.2. Process Management Systems
    A set of best practices and standards to plan, procure, implement, deliver services, manage risk and assess compliance and performance of IT solutions across the Government entities.

    4.3. Procurement Management System
    Procurement Management System aims to implement an effective process to acquire services, supplies and equipment to enhance the efficiency of Government entities. The system shall contain process and document templates such as statements of work, specifications, proposal evaluation criteria, receipt and approval of deliveries and managing suppliers against their contracts.

    4.4. Project Management System
    Project management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK) compiled by the Project Management Institute (PMI) defines project Management as the application of knowledge, skills, tools and techniques to project activities to meet project requirements. Project management is a set of principles, practices, and techniques applied to lead project teams and control project schedule, cost and performance risks. The Project Management System provides guidance and templates to initiate, plan, execute, control and close a project.

    4.5. Service Management System
    Service Management System is a process based approach for effectively managing IT operations and delivering efficient services to citizens. The system is built around the philosophy of treating citizens as customers and includes processes to handle customer requests, resolve problems and provide timely service.

    4.6. Information Security Management System
    As per the British Standards Institute (BSI) an Information Security Management System (ISMS) is a systematic approach to managing sensitive Government information so that it remains secure. An ISMS encompasses people, processes and IT systems. The key concept of ISMS is for an organization to design, implement and maintain a coherent suite of processes and systems for effectively managing information security, thus ensuring the confidentiality, integrity and availability of information assets and minimizing information security risks.

    4.7. IT Assurance Management System
    IT Assurance Management System shall provide guidance on the design, development, execution, and reporting of IT audit and assurance activities. The system shall lay down the process to assess compliance of constituent Government entities to the “Oman eGovernance Framework” and other prevailing Governance and related legal requirements with respect to the delivery of eGovernment services.

    4.8. Performance Management System
    A Performance Management System helps in proactively managing an IT Organization to ensure that it achieves pre-determined levels of performance. It uses Performance Measurement to routinely monitor performance, analyze deviations, implement corrective measures to remediate deviations and provide feedback on strategic directions.

    4.9. Standards Development and Maintenance
    MTC had endeavored to identify, evaluate, publish and maintain standards for OeGAF and Process Management Systems. In this endeavor MTC has completed the development of The Oman eGovernment Architeture Framework (OeGAF).
    With the advent of OeGAF standards and best practices being ready for use and reference, another set of standards and best practices will be produced for some of the Process Management Systems listed above such as Project Management and Information Security Management System. The standards and best practices for the other processes will be produced at a later stage as per the need of MTC and its clients.
    Development and maintenance of standards, best practices and associated artifacts require the involvement of stakeholders, a streamlined process and a reference library to catalogue the standards as discussed in the following sections.

    4.9.1. Standards Working Groups
    Working Groups are professional groups created for the purpose of identifying and documenting the need for a specific standard, studying International standards and best practices, evolving a new standard or customized version of international standards, acquiring necessary approvals and formally publishing the standards.
    The working groups shall include MTC Project Managers, Subject Matter Experts from MTC and Government Agencies and external consultants as required. The working groups shall follow a formal process to evolve and manage the standards.
    Accordingly MTC created specific working groups in order to develop the various architectures of OeGAF. The Working groups consisted of relevant subject matter experts from MTC and government agencies. The working group members collaborated constantly by sharing know-how on various areas during the development of OeGAF standards.
    For further details please refer to OeGAF Introduction document.

    4.9.2. Standards Management Process
    MTC has laid out a clear process to manage the development and maintenance of standards specified in the Oman eGovernment Architecture Framework (OeGAF) component of Oman eGovernance Framework. The process along with the templates and procedural documents is available in OeGAF Introduction document and shall be made available able to the working groups and related stakeholders for reference.
    The process:
    1. Defines the Governance structure which includes management committees, working groups, audit functions and external support if any.
    2. Specifies the membership and responsibility of the Working Group.
    3. Establishes procedures and document templates to be used in standards development and maintenance.
    4. Details the phases of the standards development process from initiation to approval to publication of standards.
    5. Outlines the need for revisiting the published standards, maintaining them up-todate and verifying their applicability at regular intervals.
    6. Guides in base-lining and bench-marking standards against International standards & best practices.

    4.9.3. Standards Reference Library
    The Standards Reference Library acts as the single point of reference for all information and data related to the “Oman eGovernance Framework”. All related documents on standards and best practices shall be categorized, catalogued and made available to the appropriate audience including working groups, IT Professionals and decision makers in the Government and IT solution Providers from the Industry as and when required.
    Currently with the OeGAF standards developed and ready for use, the same will be made available to relevant stakeholders of government agencies through hard copies and CD. A website will also be created containing OeGAF standards. This website will be made accessible to all government agencies and vendors.
    Please refer to section 1.1, “Introduction” in OeGAF Introduction document.

5. What is Oman eGovernment Architecture Framework (OeGAF)?
The Oman eGovernment Architecture Framework (OeGAF) is a structured framework similar to the Architecture blue print of a “Town Planning Authority”. The purpose of the framework is to lay down the building blocks, principles and standards that guide the design, construction, deployment and management of distributed Information Systems across the various Government Agencies.
OeGAF contains the principles, standards and building blocks that support the goals of the government. The architecture can direct the selection, use and operation of technologies needed to support government business requirements and delivery of services. The architecture can reduce the time and cost of deploying applications, while making it easier to integrate information and services.
OeGAF shall help the Government to act as an “Integrated Enterprise” and manage IT as a strategic investment.
Refer to Section 1.2, “Desired Benefits and Outcomes of OeGAF” and Section 1.3, “Components of OeGAF” in OeGAF Introduction document for further details.

6. What is Oman eGovernment Architecture Framework (OeGAF) based on?
Oman eGovernment Architecture Framework is based on industry standard architecture frameworks.
Please refer Section 1.5 “Scope of Enterprise Architecture Methodology” in OeGAF Enterprise Architecture Methodology document.

7. What are the Components / Architectures of OeGAF?
OeGAF consists of four main architectures as follows:
1. Business Reference Model
2. Solution Reference Model
3. Information Reference Model
4. Technical Reference Model

Each of the architecture has a corresponding Reference Model. Each Reference Model describes a framework to define and organise the architecture elements. Security considerations and standards for the four architectures of OeGAF are defined in the respective Reference Models.

Figure EA-3 depicts the overall OeGAF Reference Architecture.


The four OeGAF Reference Models are:

The Business Reference Model (BRM) describes the different lines of business and the associated government functions of the Oman Government that cut across the boundaries of different agencies.

The Solution Reference Model (SRM) describes the common applications and application components that can be shared across the Oman Government. It includes the technical standards and security considerations pertaining to the design and implementation of solutions and applications.

The Information Reference Model (IRM) lists the data definitions and data elements of common and shared data that are used across the Oman Government. As part of the initial baseline scope, IRM describes the data pertaining to ‘Person’, ‘Establishment’ and ‘Land’ data hubs which are commonly used by various agencies’ applications. It also defines technical standards, design and security considerations and best practices related to the management of data.

The Technical Reference Model (TRM) defines the infrastructure technologies and their respective technical standards to enable better system integration and interoperability across the Oman Government. It also defines the security considerations and standards related to the infrastructure technologies.
As shown in the Figure EA-3 above, security considerations and standards for the four architectures of OeGAF are defined in the respective Reference Models.

8. How are the Components / Architectures of OeGAF related to each other?
Each of the four Architectures of OeGAF are closely related to each other in the following ways:
• Each of the Architectures of OeGAF namely BA, SA, IA and TA follow the recommendations provided by the other architectures
• Each of the Architectures of OeGAF namely BA, SA, IA and TA reference the other architectures
• Each of the Architectures of OeGAF namely BA, SA, IA and TA are referenced by the either or all of the other architectures

Figure EA-4 below shows the relation between the four Reference Models.

The BRM provides the insight for identifying potential government functions for streamlining and optimisation of business processes, and for consolidation and integration of IT systems. It also aids the discovery of data required by the government functions.

The SRM follows up on the recommendations by the BRM to consolidate and integrate IT systems to support the streamlining and optimisation of government functions. It references the IRM’s data hubs and data management technologies for the development and deployment of applications to support the identified government functions. The SRM also leverages on the TRM’s infrastructure technologies and technical standards.

The IRM establishes common and shared data by representing them as data hubs through BRM. The IRM also identifies data management technologies which are referenced by SRM to develop and deploy application systems. In addition, the IRM leverages on the infrastructure technologies and technical standards in the TRM to ensure secure and effective data management.

The TRM provides references to the infrastructure technologies and their respective technical standards. The TRM defines the fundamental technology building blocks that are required and implemented by the Oman Government

9. Why OeGAF is important to you and how is it helpful to you?
Being one of the key components of Oman eGovernance Framework, OeGAF is essentially a whole-of-government enterprise architecture that aims to facilitate interoperability and integration of IT systems from different agencies by defining technical standards, commonly used data and IT application systems. OeGAF will allow citizens, residents and commercial establishments to experience the convenience of seamless integrated government services that involve different government agencies.

The desired business outcomes of OeGAF are therefore as follows:
a) Better and Faster Government Services to Citizens and Businesses
Through standardised access to services, uniformed processes and integrated infrastructure, government services can be improved, coordinated and delivered as one Oman Government. It is important that the IT standards and best practices act as a catalyst and a foundation for all government agencies to integrate their IT infrastructure, applications and business processes so that citizens, residents and commercial establishments interact to one and only one Oman Government.

b) More Efficient and Effective Oman Government
By adopting and adapting international IT standards and best practices, the inter-operability within and among the various government agencies can be improved. Better integration and collaboration among the government agencies will lead to the delivery of more efficient and effective government services.

c) Optimise Resources and Investments
With standardisation, current resources and investments can be better leveraged and optimised. The architectural standards will demand conformity and interoperability between current and new IT investments; thus reducing the risks of any future IT investments
Adopting the standards and best practices outlines in OeGAF, government agencies will be able to enjoy the following benefits:
a) Strategic alignment of government service objectives and IT initiatives
b) Improved decision making and elimination of inefficient and redundant processes
c) Enhanced Interoperability across the government agencies and improved capability for sharing important business related information
d) Consistent methodologies for collection, handling and presentation of business data
e) Rapid development of new applications and ease of modifications
f) A knowledge base of IT standards, best practices and related resources
g) Optimisation of the use of government IT assets
h) Streamlined procurement process and cost reduction
i) Improved adaptability to changing demands or business conditions
j) Improve customer service, achieve cost savings, and reduce complexity of IT systems
The implementation of OeGAF is also an important initiative to support the objectives of the following eOman Strategic Pillars, established in 2008 to guide MTC in its implementation of eOman Strategy:


10. What is Standards development and Maintenance? How will the OeGAF Standards be maintained, updated and communicated?

  • 10.1. Standards Development and Maintenance
    MTC had endeavored to identify, evaluate, publish and maintain standards for OeGAF and Process Management Systems. In this endeavor MTC has completed the development of The Oman eGovernment Architeture Framework (OeGAF).
    With the advent of OeGAF standards and best practices being ready for use and reference, another set of standards and best practices will be produced for some of the Process Management Systems listed above such as Project Management and Information Security Management System. The standards and best practices for the other processes will be produced at a later stage as per the need of MTC and its clients.
    Development and maintenance of standards, best practices and associated artifacts require the involvement of stakeholders, a streamlined process and a reference library to catalogue the standards as discussed in the following sections.

    10.2. Standards Working Groups
    Working Groups are professional groups created for the purpose of identifying and documenting the need for a specific standard, studying International standards and best practices, evolving a new standard or customized version of international standards, acquiring necessary approvals and formally publishing the standards.
    The working groups shall include MTC Project Managers, Subject Matter Experts from MTC and Government agencies and external consultants as required. The working groups shall follow a formal process to evolve and manage the standards.
    Accordingly MTC created specific working groups in order to develop the various architectures of OeGAF. The Working groups consisted of relevant subject matter experts from MTC and government agencies. The working group members collaborated constantly by sharing know-how on various areas during the development of OeGAF standards.
    For further details please refer to OeGAF Introduction document.

    10.3. Standards Management Process
    MTC has laid out a clear process to manage the development and maintenance of standards specified in the Oman eGovernment Architecture Framework (OeGAF) component of Oman eGovernance Framework. The process along with the templates and procedural documents is available in OeGAF Introduction document and shall be made available able to the working groups and related stakeholders for reference.
    The process:
    1. Defines the Governance structure which includes management committees, working groups, audit functions and external support if any.
    2. Specifies the membership and responsibility of the Working Group.
    3. Establishes procedures and document templates to be used in standards development and maintenance.
    4. Details the phases of the standards development process from initiation to approval to publication of standards.
    5. Outlines the need for revisiting the published standards, maintaining them up-todate and verifying their applicability at regular intervals.
    6. Guides in base-lining and bench-marking standards against International standards & best practices.

    10.4. Standards Reference Library
    The Standards Reference Library acts as the single point of reference for all information and data related to the “Oman eGovernance Framework”. All related documents on standards and best practices shall be categorized, catalogued and made available to the appropriate audience including working groups, IT Professionals and decision makers in the Government and IT solution Providers from the Industry as and when required.
    Currently with the OeGAF standards developed and ready for use, the same will be made available to relevant stakeholders of Government agencies through hard copies and CD. A website will also be created containing OeGAF standards. This website will be made accessible to all government agencies and vendors.
    Please refer to section 1.1, “Introduction” in OeGAF Introduction document.

11. Who were involved in the development of the following:
• Oman eGovernance Framework
• Oman eGovernment Architecture Framework (OeGAF)

OeGAF was developed by Working group members, the following five working groups were formed in order to develop OeGAF:
• Business Architecture Working Group
• Solution Architecture Working Group
• Information Architecture Working Group
• Technical Architecture Working Group
• Security Architecture Working Group
Each of the above working groups comprised of members both from MTC and from key government agencies who are subject matter experts in different areas.

12. Who will be involved in the ongoing maintenance and management of the OeGAF going further?
Working groups will be involved in the ongoing maintenance and management of OeGAF standards

13. What is Compliance to OeGAF Standards, What you need to do to assess compliance?
Compliance to OeGAF standards is all about assessing adherence of your IT Systems that include Infrastructure, Applications and Information to industry standards that are specified in each of the respective architectures of OeGAF.
MTC will assist government agencies in providing awareness & training of OeGAF and in conducting assessment of compliance of their IT environment with respect to OeGAF; however it is advised that government agencies put in efforts in understanding OeGAF and applying it to enhance adherence of their IT systems to OeGAF standards.

14. How do you assess compliance of existing systems with respect to OeGAF Standards?
Government agencies are requested to refer to the following tables in order to assess compliance of the their IT systems with respect to OeGAF standards:
• Considerations and Recommendations Matrix for standards in OeGAF which can be found in Section 4.0 of OeGAF Introduction document
• Standards classification table which can be found in each of the architectures of OeGAF except BRM.
• Technical and General Standards tables which can be found each of the architectures of OeGAF except BRM.
• Checklist of standards that can be found in Section 5.0 of OeGAF Introduction document
The above tables will enable you to apply relevant standards in order to assess compliance of your existing IT systems with respect to OeGAF Standards.

15. Who do you contact for further help on the following:
• Understanding the Oman eGovernance Framework and OeGAF
• For assistance in choosing, applying and assessing compliance of your IT environment to OeGAF standards

Government agencies are requested to raise an official to MTC with respect to assistance regarding OeGAF standards.

The Agency needs to follow the process as described in the service catalogue Advisory & Consultancy Special Services OeGAF Standards and Policies. (AC-5.3).

 

 

OeGAF BOOK FAQ’s- General

Structure of the OeGAF Documentation

There are seven parts to OeGAF documentation that includes the following:

  • PART I. (Introduction to OeGAF) This part provides a high-level introduction to OeGAF, document structure of the reference models of OeGAF, development and maintenance of OeGAF, considerations and recommendations matrix for standards in OeGAF, checklist of standards in OeGAF and templates for standards’ change request.

    Four main architectures of OeGAF
    While all the four architectures of OeGAG contain technical standards, design considerations and best practices related to various technology categories and technology components, in addition to this they contain details as explained below:

  • PART II. (Business Reference Model) This part comprises of two architecture elements, namely the government-wide lines of business and the associated government functions performed by the Oman Government.

    This part describes the different lines of business and the associated government functions of the Oman Government that cut across the boundaries of different agencies.
     

  • PART III. (Solution Reference Model) This part comprises of two architectural elements, namely the application design and development technology domain and the application portfolio.

    This part describes the common applications and application components that can be shared across the Oman Government. It includes the technical standards and security considerations pertaining to the design and implementation of solutions and applications.
     

  • PART IV. (Information Reference Model) This purpose of this part is to describe, document and communicate a framework to identify and describe common and shared data.

    This part lists the data definitions and data elements of common and shared data that are used across the Oman Government. As part of the initial baseline scope, IRM describes the data pertaining to ‘Person’, ‘Establishment’ and ‘Land’ data hubs which are commonly used by various agencies’ applications. It also defines technical standards, design and security considerations and best practices related to the management of data.
     

  • PART V. (Technical Reference Model) This part provides description of infrastructure technologies and their respective standards that are grouped in the five domains namely, Data Centre, Network, Platform, Service Integration and Service Access.

    This part defines the infrastructure technologies and their respective technical standards to enable better system integration and interoperability across the Oman Government. It also defines the security considerations and standards related to the infrastructure technologies.

    The security considerations and standards for the four architectures of OeGAF are defined in the respective Reference Models.

OeGAF Enterprise Architecture Development Methodology

  • PART VI. (OeGAF Enterprise Architecture Development Methodology) This part provides a detailed methodology for development of agency specific enterprise architecture.

1. How do you navigate through OeGAF in order to understand and use OeGAF properly?
It is recommended that you start getting acquainted with OeGAF by reading the architectures in the following order:

- Introduction to OeGAF
- Business Reference Model
- Solution Reference Model
- Information Reference Model
- Technical Reference Model

OeGAF Enterprise Architecture Development Methodology

2. How are the different Components / Architectures of OeGAF Structured?
The structure of each of the architectures of OeGAF is as follows:

  • 2.1. Business Reference Model
    The BRM uses a three-level hierarchy structure to describe the business of Oman Government in the following manners:
    a) Two areas of business that categorise the lines of business are as follows:
    I. Services to Citizens, Residents and Commercial Establishments are external customer facing services that Oman Government provides.
    II. Internal Corporate and Support Services are activities that support the delivery of government services and ensure the effective operations of Oman Government.

    b) There are twenty one lines of business in the Services to Citizens, Residents and Commercial Establishments business area and three lines of business in the Internal Corporate and Support Services business area. The lines of business in each business area are further categorised as follows:
    I. Vertical lines of business refer to government services that relate directly to a business domain
    II. Horizontal lines of business refer to common government services that can be found across different business domains

    c) Within each line of business are a set of associated government functions.
    Figure BA-5 below provides an overview of the Oman Government lines of business.
    Figure BA-5: Overview of the Oman Government Lines of Business
     

  • 2.2. Solution Reference Model
    As shown in Figure SA-3, the SRM consists of two main parts – the Oman Government Application Portfolio and the Application Design and Development Technology Domain.

  • The Oman Government Application Portfolio addresses the following:
    a) What are the applications and solutions available today?
    b) Which agency implements the current applications and solutions?
    c) Where do the current applications and solutions reside?
    d) What are the interfaces among the current applications?
    e) What are the applications and solutions of the future?
    f) When will the future applications and solutions be implemented?
    On the other hand, the Application Design and Development Technology Domain address these:
    a) How to design, develop and test the applications?
    b) What are the application standards to comply with?
    c) What are the application design considerations and best practices?

    For easy reference, the Oman Government Application Portfolio would be described first followed by the Application Design and Development Technology Domain.

    The Oman Government Application Portfolio, which describes the both current and target application portfolios, has the following structure:

    a) Intent
    Describes the intent of the application portfolio

    b) Approach
    Describes the approach in developing the application portfolio

    c) Definitions
    Defines the main terms used

    d) Current Application Portfolio
    Lists the current applications used in the selected government agencies, the current central initiatives and the challenges faced.

    e) Target Application Portfolio
    Lists the various future solutions

    The Application Design and Development Technology Domain is structured as follows:

    a) Intent
    Describes the intent of the technology domain

    b) Domain Design Principles
    Describes the domain design principles

    c) Application Development Methodology
    Describes the recommended application development methodology for adoption by Government agencies

    d) Technology Categories and Components
    Lists the technology categories and their components

    e) Architecture Design Considerations
    Describes the key design considerations when developing an application

    f) Technical Standards and General Standards
    List and describe the mandatory and recommended technical standards for application development and deployment.

    g) Best Practices
    Describes the international best practices in application development

    h) Technology Watch
    Lists the new technologies that may affect future application development
     

  • 2.3. Information Reference Model
    The IRM provides a framework for building a consistent Information Architecture and describes the common and shared data within Oman Government through the identification of Data Hubs, which are the ‘Person’ and ‘Establishment’ hubs.
    The IRM also describes the technologies and technical standards of the Data Management Domain. The domain will be structured in the IRM according to the following sections:
    a) Intent
    b) Domain Design Principles
    c) Central Initiatives
    d) Technology Categories and Components
    e) Architecture Design Considerations
    f) Technical Standards and General Standards
    g) Best Practices
    h) Technology Watch

    2.4. Technical Reference Model
    The TRM describes the infrastructure technologies and their respective technical standards that are grouped into five domains. The TRM, however, does not include IT operations which will be addressed under the Process Management of the Oman eGovernance Framework. The five domains are:
    a) Data Centre
    b) Network
    c) Platform
    d) Service Integration
    e) Service Access

    Each domain in the TRM will be structured according to the following sections:
    a) Intent
    b) Relation to Other Domains
    c) Domain Design Principles
    d) Central Initiatives
    e) Technology Categories and Components
    f) Architecture Design Considerations
    g) Technical Standards and General Standards
    h) Best Practices
    i) Technology Watch

3. What information is available in the OeGAF Introduction Book?
The OeGAF introductory chapter will give the users an overview of the OeGAF Architectures, the relationship between the Architectures, how OeGAF document is presented and what are the various ways OeGAF book can be referred.

There are also scenarios defined which will help in identifying the relevant standards related to a particular situation and which will assist your agency in identifying the key areas that need to be focused in OeGAF.

It also provides information on how OeGAF was developed and further maintained. It also provides information on the process and templates that will be handy for suggesting changes, exemptions, improvements and assistance from MTC.

 

OeGAF BOOK FAQ’s- Business Reference Model

What is Business Reference Model (BRM) and where does it fit-in in OeGAF?
The Business Architecture of the Oman eGovernment Architecture Framework (OeGAF) comprises two architecture elements, namely the government-wide lines of business and the associated government functions performed by the Oman Government.

The BRM defines and provides the detailed description of these government-wide lines of business and the associated government functions. Establishing this government-wide view will enable the prioritisation of government functions to be streamlined and centralised or common IT systems to be implemented, leading to overall efficiency of the Oman Government and greater convenience to the constituents of government services.

Business Reference Model (BRM) is the first of the four reference models of OeGAF, ideally government agencies should map their respective Lines of Business and the Government Functions as defined in the Business Reference Model. Once the same is done then government agencies can refer to the solution reference model and identify the systems and applications that are in place or implement the systems as per the recommendations stated in Solution Reference Model. While implementing or enhancing application or systems you can make use of the Information Reference Model in identifying the technical standards, design considerations and best practices to manage the integration and exchange of data and also refer to the code tables and data dictionary that is defined in IRM. Furthermore in order to support the applications and the data residing in them government agencies can refer to the Technical Reference Model that contains references to infrastructure technologies and their respective technical standards. The TRM defines the fundamental technology building blocks that are required and implemented by the Oman Government.

2. How is BRM helpful to you?
The BRM is one of the fundamental components of OeGAF. It defines the different lines of business and the associated government functions of the Oman Government that cut across the boundaries of different agencies.

Through this government-wide perspective of lines of business and government functions, the BRM provides an insight for identifying potential government functions for streamlining and optimisation of business processes, and for consolidation and integration of IT systems.

The Oman Government will be highly effective and efficient in performing its functions as a result of the follow up efforts to streamline and optimise business processes, and consolidate and integrate IT systems. The final beneficiaries will be the citizens, residents and commercial establishments in Oman as they will enjoy greater convenience and better user experience when they transact with the Oman Government.
Hence, the development of BRM is important and necessary to support the objectives of the following eOman Strategic Pillars, established in 2008 to guide the Ministry of Technology and Communications (MTC) in its implementation of eOman Strategy:
a) National Infrastructure Development
b) Enhance Government Performance
c) Development of Standards, Policies, Procedures and Regulations
Figure BA-1 depicts how the BRM supports the above mentioned eOman Strategic Pillars.

Figure BA-1: BRM Supports the eOman Strategic Pillars

With proper follow through, the BRM will bring about the below benefits:
• Enhance interoperability across government agencies
• Facilitate move towards shared services
• Leverage on current IT investment and assets
• Improve user experience, achieve cost savings, and reduce complexity
• Augment the governance practices through clearer accountability
• Align IT projects of government agencies to central IT initiatives

3. When do you need to refer to BRM?
The BRM treats the Oman Government as a large business enterprise when defining its lines of business and the associated government functions. Hence, the BRM is a business architecture document that provides a good representation of the business of the Oman Government. Upon careful study of the BRM, it will provide a thorough insight into the different functions of the Oman Government business.

4. What are the areas that you can focus in BRM?
It is very important that government agencies identify and understand which LOB and associated government functions they belong to by referring to the BRM. This is because a ministry is either involved as a Primary agency or as a enabling agency in the fulfilment and delivery of LOB’s and associated government functions through its specific areas of responsibility.
Each LOB will have one or more government agencies involved and they are categorized as follows:
• Primary agency is the agency that is overall responsible for a government function.
• Enabling agency contributes to the fulfillment of a government function through its specific areas of responsibility.
Once the government agencies identify their association either as a primary agency or as a enabling agency with respect to LOB’s they can accordingly initiate in developing the respective LOB’s by collaborating with other related agencies.

5. What standards’ / information does BRM Contain?
BRM addresses only the business perspective of the enterprise and the whole of government and does not provide any technical standards.

6. Who should read and understand BRM?
Please refer to the section 1.6 of the Business Reference Model Document for detailed information regarding the Target Audience for BRM.

7. Who do you have to contact for further queries / clarifications regarding BRM?
Please refer to the Service catalogue offering from MTC.
 

OeGAF BOOK FAQ’s- Solution Reference Model

1. What is Solution Reference Model (SRM) and where does it fit-in in OeGAF?
Government services to the citizens, residents and commercial establishments can be improved through technology standardisation and service integration amongst the Oman government agencies.

The Solution Reference Model (SRM) describes the common applications and application components that can be shared across the Oman Government. It includes the technical standards and security considerations pertaining to the design and implementation of solutions and applications.
The purpose of the SRM is to document two architecture elements, namely the application design and development technology domain and the application portfolio.
The application design and development technology domain describes the recommended application design and development methodology and technical standards. Standardisation on the use of application technologies is necessary so that common business functions and information can be shared amongst government agencies. Application technology standardisation is also a fundamental requirement before government agencies can integrate their various functions as a seamless government service to the citizens and commercial establishments.

The application portfolio describes the Information Technology (IT) solutions that can improve integration of government services through sharing and re-use of applications and their components amongst government agencies. The application portfolio is used to explore and find opportunities for application sharing, re-use and improvements.
Solution Reference Model (BRM) is the second of the four reference models of OeGAF, ideally government agencies should start with mapping their respective Lines of Business and the Government Functions as defined in the Solution Reference Model. Once the same is done then government agencies can refer to the solution reference model and identify the systems and applications that are in place or implement the systems as per the recommendations stated in Solution Reference Model. While implementing or enhancing application or systems you can make use of the Information Reference Model in identifying the technical standards, design considerations and best practices to manage the integration and exchange of data and also refer to the code tables and data dictionary that is defined in IRM. Furthermore in order to support the applications and the data residing in them government agencies can refer to the Technical Reference Model that contains references to infrastructure technologies and their respective technical standards. The TRM defines the fundamental technology building blocks that are required and implemented by the Oman Government.

2. How is SRM helpful to you?
The SRM is the main component of Oman eGovernment Architecture Framework (OeGAF) that describes the IT solutions that provides technology standardisation and service integration so as to improve and enhance government functions. The SRM aims to encourage the re-use of applications and their components to derive economies of scale for the Oman Government.
The SRM analyses current limitations and gaps, and lists the opportunities for consolidation and integration of IT solutions. Besides cost efficiency, the recommendations from the SRM would enable government agencies to provide more integrated government services to the citizens, residents and commercial establishments. With the SRM, the Oman government agencies would be more responsive to the needs of the citizens, residents and commercial establishments in providing convenient, integrated and faster turnaround services.
With proper follow through, the SRM will bring about the following potential benefits:
• Improve government services to stakeholders (citizens, residents and commercial establishments)
• Enhance interoperability across government agencies
• Leverage on current IT investment and assets; and reduce Oman Government’s total cost of ownership on future IT investments
• Align agencies IT projects to central IT initiatives.

3. When do you need to refer to SRM?
Government agencies can make SRM when procuring, designing and development of applications. The application portfolio in SRM can be used to explore and find opportunities for application sharing, re-use and improvements.

4. What are the areas that you can focus in SRM?
Some of the key areas that government agencies can focus on in SRM are standards, design considerations and best practices pertaining to application design and development technology domain. Other key area to focus on in SRM is pertaining to current application portfolio and target application portfolio. The current application portfolio provides information regarding comprehensive selection of the current applications, the current central initiatives. The current application portfolio is used to explore and find opportunities for application sharing, re-use and improvements. It serves as a baseline reference for MTC and the OeGAF Working Group to plan, design, construct and update the target application portfolio. The objective of the target application portfolio is to improve the government services to citizens, residents and commercial establishments through the use of shared IT solutions or re-usable service components.

5. What standards’ / information does SRM Contain?
SRM provides standards, architecture considerations and best practices related to application design and development. SRM also contains security considerations pertaining to the design and implementation of solutions and applications.

6. Who should read and understand the SRM?
Please refer to the section 1.7 of the Solution Reference Model Document for detailed information regarding the Target Audience for SRM.

7. Who do you have to contact for further queries / clarifications regarding SRM?
Please refer to the Service catalogue offering from MTC.
 

OeGAF BOOK FAQ’s - Information Reference Model

1. What is Information Reference Model (IRM) and where does it fit-in in OeGAF?
The purpose of the Information Reference Model (IRM) is to describe, document and communicate a framework to identify and describe common and shared data.
The IRM also introduces data management and data exchange technologies and technical standards, design considerations and best practices so as to manage the integration and exchange of data across all government agencies in the Sultanate of Oman.
Ideally you should map your agency to the Lines of Business and the Government Functions that are defined in the Business Reference Model. Once the same is done then you can refer to the solution reference model and identify the system and applications that are in place or implement system as per the recommendations stated in Solution Reference Model. While implementing or enhancing application or systems you can make use of the Information Reference Model in identifying the technical standards, design considerations and best practices to manage the integration and exchange of data and also refer to the code tables and data dictionary that is defined in IRM.

2. How is IRM helpful to you?
IRM is a single point of reference for all the Government entities in Oman for standards, data dictionary definitions, code tables and to understand about the data entities in the person, business and land hub.

3. When do you need to refer to IRM?
You can make use of IRM when you are planning to procure, design or enhance any of the existing databases or when you have plans to exchange data between government agencies.

4. What are the areas that you can focus in IRM?
Some of key areas of IRMS are the Standards, Design Considerations, Target Architecture to get the details regarding people, Business and Land Hub and also the code tables. The other data sources is also a good reference material while developing or enhancing any new database or while considering data exchange.

5. What standards’ / information does IRM Contain?
IRM provides standards related to the most common areas like Database Management, Data Design, Data exchange, Data Security, Data Storage, Backup and Archival and Data Management Strategy.

6. Who should read and understand IRM?
Please refer to the section 1.6 of the Information Reference Document for detailed information regarding the Target Audience for IRM.

7. Who do you have to contact for further queries / clarifications regarding IRM?
Please refer to the Service catalogue offering from MTC.
 

OeGAF BOOK FAQ’s- Technical Reference Model

1. What is Technical Reference Model (TRM) and where does it fit-in in OeGAF?
The Technical Reference Model (TRM) defines the infrastructure technologies and their respective technical standards to enable better system integration and interoperability across the Oman Government. It also defines the security considerations and standards related to the infrastructure technologies.
The TRM describes the fundamental infrastructure technology building blocks that are required for IRM and SRM. The IRM requires the availability of the infrastructure technologies and technical standards in the TRM to ensure secure and effective data management. The SRM uses the infrastructure technologies and technical standards defined by TRM to support the development and deployment of applications and e-services.

2. How is TRM helpful to you?
TRM will bring potentially bring about the following benefits for agencies:
a) Align your IT projects to central IT initiatives
b) Help in selection of technologies and standards for enhancing the current IT infrastructure and deploying new IT solutions.
c) Enhance interoperability with other government agencies

3. When do you need to refer to TRM?
You can refer to TRM to:
a) Assess your current IT infrastructure against prescribed standards
b) Select technologies for new infrastructure projects
c) Learn about MTC’s central initiatives and benefit from using these initiatives
d) Integrate with other ministry IT infrastructure platforms

4. What are the areas that you can focus in TRM?
While planning to enhance the current IT infrastructure or roll-out new IT deployments you can consider the following sections of the respective domains:
a) Central Initiatives
b) Architecture Design Considerations
c) Technical and General Standards and
d) Best Practices

5. What standards’ / information does TRM Contain?

TRM contains information and standards related to the following domains:
a) Data Center
b) Network
c) Platform
d) Service Integration and
e) Service Access

6. Who should read and understand the TRM?
Please refer to the section 1.6 of the Technical Reference Document for detailed information regarding the Target Audience for TRM.

7. Who do you have to contact for further queries / clarifications regarding TRM?
Please refer to the Service catalogue offering from MTC.
 

OeGAF BOOK FAQ’s- Enterprise Architecture Methodology

1. What is OeGAF Enterprise Architecture Development Methodology and where does it fit-in in OeGAF?
Enterprise Architecture (EA) is a framework to rationalise, align and manage the enterprise’s IT projects and resources to better support its business objectives and functions in a disciplined and systematic manner. When successfully developed and implemented, EA will bring about the following benefits to the enterprise:
a) Align IT projects to business objectives and functions.
b) Reflect the integration and standardisation of IT infrastructure requirements.
c) Provide critical inputs to strategic IT planning process.
d) Enhance interoperability across different business divisions.
e) Improve decision making in selection of technologies.
f) Leverage on current IT investment and resources.
g) Manage and prioritise new IT investment and resources.
The purpose of the Enterprise Architecture Methodology (EAM) is to describe, document and communicate a methodology to guide agencies in planning and developing their very own EA.

2. How is OeGAF Enterprise Architecture Development Methodology helpful to you?
The key objectives of EAM are to guide agencies in the planning and development of EA, and the management of the EA development process. The EAM also aims to bring about the following outcomes:
a) IT projects in agencies are aligned to its vision and mission.
b) Agencies are encouraged to leverage on central initiatives.
c) Development efforts of EA in agencies are consistent and efficient.

3. When do you need to refer to OeGAF Enterprise Architecture Development Methodology?
You can make use of OeGAG Enterprise Architecture Development Methodology when you are planning to undertake development of enterprise architecture for your agency.

4. What are the areas that you can focus in OeGAF Enterprise Architecture Development Methodology?
The EAM provides a framework for building a consistent EA across agencies. It adopts the best practices from Singapore’s Methodology for Agency Enterprise Architecture (MAGENTA) and The Open Group Architecture Framework (TOGAF). The development phases of EAM are depicted in a graphical diagram as shown in Figure EAM-1-5-1.



The development phases of the EAM are briefly outlined below. The following section of the EAM will provide detailed description for the activities in each phase.

a) Phase 1 - Establish Enterprise Architecture Programme
The activities in this phase are required to prepare the EA programme. It looks at the identification of programme sponsor and the formation of the EA team. It validates the agency’s strategic initiatives and establishes the business case and readiness for developing an EA. A set of development principles is also provided to guide agencies in their development of EA. See OeGAF Enterprise Architecture Development Methdology document, section 2.1 for details.

b) Phase 2 - Govern and Manage EA Development
The activities in this phase are put in place to govern and sustain the implementation of the EA programme. See OeGAF Enterprise Architecture Development Methdology document, section 2.2 for details.

c) Phase 3 - Scan and Analyse Current Business State
The activities in this phase examine the current business vision, objectives, core business functions and processes. See OeGAF Enterprise Architecture Development Methdology document, section 2.3 for details.

d) Phase 4 - Understand Current IT Architecture
The activities in this phase determine the application, data and technical infrastructure currently in place to support the business processes. It also specifies the technical standards and technology currently adopted by the agency. See OeGAF Enterprise Architecture Development Methdology document, section 2.4 for details.

e) Phase 5 - Analyse Gaps and Identify Opportunities
The activities in this phase analyse the gaps and identify opportunities to aid in the development of the target architectures. See OeGAF Enterprise Architecture Development Methdology document, section 2.5 for details.

f) Phase 6 - Develop Target Business Architecture
The activities in this phase define the target core business processes so as to align them with the business objectives. See Section 2.6 for details.

g) Phase 7 - Develop Target IT Architecture
The activities in this phase define the applications, data and technical infrastructure required to support the target business architecture. See Section 2.7 for details.

h) Phase 8 - Develop EA Blueprint
The activities in this phase provide the guidelines to document the enterprise architecture from the outputs of the earlier phases. See Section 2.8 for details.

i) Phase 9 - Develop Transition Plan for Priority Projects
The activities in this phase develop the transition plan for implementing the identified priority projects. See Section 2.9 for details.

j) Phase 10 - Maintain EA Blueprint
The activities in this phase monitor the changes in business and technology. Assessment is done to understand the impact of the changes and recommend the actions required to update the EA. See Section 2.10 for details.

5. What standards’ / information does OeGAF Enterprise Architecture Development Methodology Contain?
The EAM provides a framework for building a consistent Enterprise Architecture across agencies.

6. Who should read and understand the OeGAF Enterprise Architecture Development Methodology?
Please refer to the section 1.7 of the OeGAF Enterprise Architecture Development Methodology for detailed information regarding the Target Audience for OeGAF EAM.

7. Who do you have to contact for further queries / clarifications regarding OeGAF Enterprise Architecture Development Methodology?
Please refer to the Service catalogue offering from MTC.


OeGAF Implementation/ Practioners FAQ’s General

1. We are planning to float an RFP. How can I ensure that vendor’s quote is compliant with OeGAF recommendations?
For procurement of new systems or for carrying out enhancements to existing systems, you can make use of the Standards checklists which can be found in Section 5.0 of OeGAF Introduction document and include them as part of RFP in order to enable vendors to provide their responses regarding adherence of their solutions to OeGAF standards.

2. I am not able to comply with some standards. In this case what do I need to do?
According to the Standards classification table in TRM, SRM and IRM architectures of OeGAF, it has been mentioned that government agencies are required to contact MTC for exemptions wherever adherence to standards is not possible due to constraints or other reasons. MTC with its relevant subject matter experts would provide necessary assistance to address such non-compliance.

3. What is the timeframe for compliance to OeGAF?
1. Currently the time-frame for compliance of OeGAF is not decided as the focus is primarily on awareness and training. Once the government agencies and agencies starts adapting the standards MTC will decide on the timeframe for compliance.

2. MTC is planning to ensure profiling of agencies with respect to compliance to OeGAF wherein relevant SME’s / Lead architects of each of the architectures of OeGAF shall assist the government agencies in benchmarking the alignment of agencies with respect to OeGAF. Further to which agencies can come up with a roadmap for relevant enhancements to their IT systems in order to enhance their compliance levels to respective architectures of OeGAF.

3. Will MTC conduct audit and if so how frequently?
There are no audits planned immediately upon launch and publishing of OeGAF standards, but MTC is planning to do the following:

  1. Conduct awareness sessions of OeGAF for government agencies to ensure that government agencies’ understand OeGAF and its importance / benefits.

  2. Conduct profiling of agencies with respect to compliance to OeGAF wherein relevant SME’s / Lead architects of each of the architectures of OeGAF shall assist the government agencies in benchmarking the alignment of agencies with respect to OeGAF. Further to which agencies can come up with a roadmap for relevant enhancements to their IT systems in order to enhance their compliance levels to respective architectures of OeGAF. This exercise will be planned to be conducted to various government agencies going forth.

  3. Once acceptable levels of awareness and compliance with respect to OeGAF are achieved, then MTC will plan to conduct audits to assess compliance levels.
     

4. Will MTC provide any assistance in adapting OeGAF?
The various types of assistance that are planned by MTC to assist government agencies and agencies in adapting OeGAF are:
1. Website where information regarding all the Standards are available.
2. The process and the template for requesting assistance or exemption from a standard is defined as part of the Introduction Chapter in the OeGAF.
3. Conduct awareness sessions of OeGAF for government agencies to ensure that government agencies’ understand OeGAF and its importance / benefits.
4. Conduct profiling of agencies with respect to compliance to OeGAF wherein relevant SME’s / Lead architects of each of the architectures of OeGAF shall assist the government agencies in benchmarking the alignment of agencies with respect to OeGAF. Further to which agencies can come up with a roadmap for relevant enhancements to their IT systems in order to enhance their compliance levels to respective architectures of OeGAF. This exercise will be planned to be conducted to various government agencies going forth.

5. How is MTC going to enforce the standards across Government agencies?
Several awareness campaigns will be conducted by the Governance and Advisory Team, including workshops, training and presentations.

6. How often is MTC going to update the standards?
MTC will maintain and update the standards on a regular basis with minor release at least once a year, and with major release every 2 to 3 years.

7. Will MTC directly be responsible for developing and architecting government departments IT systems?
No, MTC will only provide expert advice, guidance, support and coordination (if needed). The entity is responsible for implementing its own architectures

8. When should government agency contact MTC to verify that the current IT project is up to standards?
Agencies are encouraged to contact at anytime to clarify about OeGAF.

9. Can I make an Inquiry? What is the process?
MTC has defined a template and the same is available in the OeGAF Introduction chapter section that enables government entities to submit their suggestions, clarifications, change requests and support requests.


OeGAF Implementation/ Practioners FAQ’s Business Reference Model

1. What is LOB?
LOB is “Lines of Business” and is a broad category of government functions.
The BRM uses a three-level hierarchy structure to describe the business of Oman Government in the following manners:
a) Two areas of business that categorise the lines of business are as follows:
i. Services to Citizens, Residents and Commercial Establishments are external customer facing services that Oman Government provides.
ii. Internal Corporate and Support Services are activities that support the delivery of government services and ensure the effective operations of Oman Government.

b) There are twenty one lines of business in the Services to Citizens, Residents and Commercial Establishments business area and three lines of business in the Internal Corporate and Support Services business area. The lines of business in each business area are further categorised as follows:
i. Vertical lines of business refer to government services that relate directly to a business domain
ii. Horizontal lines of business refer to common government services that can be found across different business domains
(c) Within each line of business are a set of associated government functions.

2. How is a Ministry related to LOB?
Each LOB will have one or more government agencies involved and they are categorized as follows:
• Primary agency is the agency that is overall responsible for a government function.
• Enabling agency contributes to the fulfilment of a government function through its specific areas of responsibility.

3. Currently we are organized as Government agencies. So how is LOB related to me?
Even though you are currently part of a Ministry the LOB’s are applicable to you. Your Ministry will be part of one or multiple LOB’s defined in OeGAF. In some of the LOB’s your Ministry might be involved as a primary agency and in some other LOB’s your ministry might be an enabling agency.

4. How do I find my ministry and the LOB that my ministry belongs to?
Refer to the BRM section 2.4 “Description of Government Functions” wherein there is a mapping of government agencies to LOB’s and Government functions within the LOB’s.

5. How relevant is it for me in knowing which LOB my ministry belongs to?
It is very important that government agencies figure out and understand which LOB and associated government functions they belong to be reading BRM. This is because a ministry is either involved as a Primary agency or as a enabling agency in the fulfilment and delivery of LOB’s and associated government functions through its specific areas of responsibility.

6. Why is it essential for me to know which LOB my ministry belongs to?
This is because a ministry is either involved as a Primary agency or as a enabling agency in the fulfilment and delivery of LOB’s and associated government functions through its specific areas of responsibility.

7. What should I do once I identified the LOB that my ministry is part of?
First of all you need to identify who is the primary agency for the LOB and who are all the other agencies involved in the LOB and its associated government functions. Having identified the primary and other agencies you need to plan alignment of your existing IT systems or any planned initiatives in order to integrate and deliver the services within such LOB and its associated government functions. A committee of the related agencies who are part of the LOB and its associated government functions should be formed wherein it should be discussed as to what the areas of application integration are and how it can be achieved.

8. I understand the LOB and its relevance. What should I do next?

1. Understand the solutions that are associated to LOB’s
2. Understand the data hubs
3. Plus the answer to the previous question

9. I am not part of Civil service ministry. Does that exclude me?
To provide a complete government-wide perspective of lines of business and the associated government functions, the BRM covers the functions of seventy one identified government agencies. These seventy one agencies are identified through careful study of the lists of agencies used by Ministry of National Economy for their annual statistical year book and Institute of Public Administration’s Guide to Administrative System in Oman. The list of seventy one agencies is therefore considered to be a good representation of the Oman Government. The seventy one identified agencies are listed in BRM document.
 

OeGAF Implementation/ Practioners FAQ’s Solution Reference Model

1. I am initiating a software application development. What all areas in OeGAF is relevant to me?

1. BA for LOB’s and their associated government functions
2. SA for solutions
3. IA for data hubs and common code tables
4. TA for infrastructure components

 

OeGAF Implementation/ Practioners FAQ’s Information Reference Model

1. When I design a database what are the key points that I need to consider from OeGAF perspective.
OeGAF information architecture provides standards related to areas of database selection, design, data exchange etc. Also there are standard code tables and information related to common data elements ex : Civil number provided as part of information architecture. Definition and creation of new database tables and e data elements will help in aligning your solution with the national standards.

2. Do I need to use the naming conventions stated in the OeGAF Standards for my database tables and fields?
MTC is not expecting government agencies to change the existing definitions to match the definition in the OeGAF. However MTC expects the government agencies to adapt the same while developing new or enhancing the existing databases. This will ensure that a common standard is achieved over a period of time.

3. Do I need to change the code tables to match the code tables defined in OeGAF?
MTC is not expecting government agencies to change the existing code tables to match the code table definition in the OeGAF on a war footing basis. However MTC expects the government agencies to adapt the same while developing new databases and to consider the same as mapping reference table while considering exchange of data between agencies in case your current code table does not match the standard code table definitions.

4. I want to exchange data from my ministry to another ministry. What are the points I need to focus on?
The Information architecture provided standards related to data exchange. Also standard and commonly used code table information is provided and the same can be used as mapping tables in case there is inconsistency between your information and the target entities information.

5. I need to access the Citizen Profile to check some basic data? Is this available as part of OeGAF?
OeGAF Information Architecture defines in detail all the elements and information related to various fields of a Citizen profile. Agencies are also requested to contact MTC team as we are constantly working with concerned agencies in developing interfaces and to offer access to citizen data as web service over the Official government Portal.

6. I need to access Business Entity information as part of my internal application? Does OeGAF provide details related to this?
OeGAF Information Architecture defines in detail all the elements and information related to various fields of a Business entity. Agencies are also requested to contact MTC team as we are constantly working with concerned agencies in developing interfaces and to offer access to business entity data as web service over the Official government Portal.


OeGAF Implementation/ Practioners FAQ’s Technical Reference Model

1. If I want to procure some infrastructure components which all sections of OeGAF should I refer to?
The TRM contain five domains namely, Data Center, network, platform, Service Access and Service Integration. Relevant infrastructure components have been grouped under each of the domains. Agencies are required to refer to the domains for relevant infrastructure components. Additionally there are standards checklists which list standards for infrastructure components under specific domains.

2. If I am embarking on a new IT initiative which all Architectures should I refer to?
1. BA for LOB’s
2. SA for similar solutions
3. IA for common code tables and
4. TA for Infrastructure standards
Downloads of the OeGAF documentation, including downloadable and printable PDF files are available on the MTC website (www.mtc.gov.om).